BunnyBots

BunnyBots 2017 and the new game "Hide and Seek" will be announced here Sept 1st, 2017!  BunnyBots 2017 will be held December 9th, 2017 at Catlin Gabel School in Portland Oregon.

For more information on Bunny Bots 2016, click here.

The annual BunnyBots competition is one of the highlights of the FRC off-season for teams in the Portland area. It expands the boundaries of the 6-week build season to make FIRST last all year. Last year, 24 entered and hundreds of spectators showed up, a huge increase from the 3-robot start in 2008. Each year, Flaming Chicken alumni and mentors design the rules and provide the primary volunteer force to run the event. BunnyBots provides a way for new teams and new members to gain vital skills before FRC build season. For many students, this is their first experience making an FRC-quality robot. We hope this experience and the excitement of BunnyBots competition day stays with them forever.

BunnyBots 2013

BunnyBots 2013

Team 1540 uses BunnyBots as the goal for our fall season; any prospective members on a technical track must take part in building a BunnyBot. It serves the team by allowing new members to gain experience doing various tasks on the team. Hosting an off-season competition also enables new members from other teams to do the same. BunnyBots gets every FRC team in the mood for build season. Parents have always been supportive of BunnyBots, and many attend the competition to show support for the team. It allows parents a chance to know what their children have been doing in robotics. 

BunnyBots 2012

BunnyBots 2012

The game design process begins after the game season each year. Team 1540 seniors, alumni, and mentors brainstorm game ideas, and make the rules. The head mentor oversees the seniors and makes any necessary edits. The game is released in early September, and teams sign up on their own schedule.

Volunteer positions for BunnyBots are primarily filled by Team 1540 members, alumni, and parents. Setup is done the previous night. It takes 3 hours on average, and involves moving equipment, building the field, and troubleshooting the scoring system. Sound, queueing, and judging is done by the alumni. Score managing and emceeing is run by current members. Field reset is led by a team member, who is helped by volunteers from other teams.